If everyone is thinking the same, someone isn't thinking

Lori MacVittie

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Top Stories by Lori MacVittie

JANUARY 8, 2014 02:00 PM EST When we talk about the impact of BYOD and BYOA and the Internet of Things, we often focus on the impact on data center architectures. That's because there will be an increasing need for authentication, for access control, for security, for application delivery as the number of potential endpoints (clients, devices, things) increases. That means scale in the data center. What we gloss over, what we skip, is that before any of these "things" ever makes a request to access an application it had to execute a DNS query. Every. Single. Thing. Maybe that's because we assume DNS can handle the load. So far it's done well. You rarely, if ever, hear of disruptions or outages due directly to the execution of DNS. Oh, there has been some issues with misconfiguration of DNS and of exploitation of DNS (hijacking, illicit use in reflection attacks, et... (more)

Clash of Ops | @DevOpsSummit #BigData #APM #DevOps #Docker #Monitoring

It was a Monday. I was reading the Internet. Okay, I was skimming feeds. Anyway, I happened across a title that intrigued me, "Stateful Apps and Containers: Squaring the Circle." It had all the right buzzwords (containers) and mentioned state, a topic near and dear to this application networking-oriented gal, so I happily clicked on through. Turns out that Stateful Apps are not Stateful Apps. Seriously. To be fair, I should really say that when a devops guy talks about ‘stateful apps' it is not the same thing as when a netops gal uses the term ‘stateful apps.'  That's because the... (more)

APIs Are Not Web Pages | @DevOpsSummit #API #IoT #M2M #DNS #DevOps

There’s a tendency, particularly for networkers, to classify applications by the protocols they use. If it uses HTTP, it must be a web app. The thing is that HTTP has become what it was intended to be: a transport protocol. It is not an application protocol, in the sense that it defines application messages and states. It merely transports data in a very specific way. That’s particularly important in the age of the API and, increasingly, the age of things that might be using APIs. You see, APIs are primarily data centric constructs while web pages (think any HTML-based app) are do... (more)

HTTPS Is Not Faster Than HTTP | @DevOpsSummit #WebPerf #DataCenter

Yes, Lori has been reading the Internet again. And what she's been seeing makes baby Lori angry. It also makes this former test designer and technology editor cry. Really, I weep at both the excuses offered for such testing and the misleading headline. I have read no less than two contrived comparisons of "HTTPS" and "HTTP" in the last two weeks purporting to demonstrate that secure HTTP is inarguably faster than its plaintext counterpart, HTTP. Oh, if only that were true. See, the trick is that both comparisons (and no doubt many more will follow) are comparing secure HTTP/2 wi... (more)

Microservices and HTTP/2 | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #Microservices

It's all about that architecture. There's a lot of things we do to improve the performance of web and mobile applications.  We use caching. We use compression. We offload security (SSL and TLS) to a proxy with greater compute capacity. We apply image optimization and minification to content. We do all that because performance is king. Failure to perform can be, for many businesses, equivalent to an outage with increased abandonment rates and angry customers taking to the Internet to express their extreme displeasure. The recently official HTTP/2 specification takes performance very... (more)